Yes, you can use Facebook to serve a lawsuit on an out of state Defendant…Sometimes

HNW Business Law

By Fredrick P. Niemann, Esq. of Hanlon Niemann & Wright, a Freehold, NJ Lawsuit and Litigation Attorney Plaintiffs instituted this action to enjoin defendant from holding himself out as the father of their son, Z.A. to enjoin defendant from contracting plaintiffs and Z.A., and to compel defendant to remove information pertaining to Z.A. that he has allegedly published online. Plaintiffs are Z.A.’s adoptive parents. Z.A.’s biological father of record is J.P. Plaintiffs indicate that defendant is a “complete stranger” to them, and they have not had any contact with him prior to the events that gave rise to this litigation. Plaintiffs alleged that defendant initiated contact with their family by locating K.A.’s Facebook profile and sending him a friend request, …

Spouses Can Be Held Liable for Certain Unpaid Debts of Their Husband or Wife

HNW Elder Law, Estate Administration and Probate

By Fredrick P. Niemann, an Estate Administration Attorney   Did you know that a creditor may be able to come after you for some of the debts that your spouse has incurred? You heard me correctly. New Jersey’s law of necessities states that certain expenses of one spouse are actually guaranteed to be paid by both spouses, even the one not involved with the transaction. Normally, a person is not liable for the debts of another absent an agreement between the two people. However, marriage is a key exception to this rule. Since marriage involves a unique bond between two people, they share some of the debts of each other. The New Jersey Supreme Court has handed down this rule …

Religious Discrimination

HNW Business Law, Employment Law

Employers may not be familiar with their obligations concerning an employee’s religion or religious practices.  Under federal anti-discrimination laws, religion does not mean only mainstream or organized religions.  Rather, an employee need only have a religious belief, common or uncommon in the community, that is sincerely held. There are essentially two kinds of religious discrimination recognized by federal law.   (1) Failure to make a reasonable accommodation: Once an employee notifies his or her employer that a bona fide religious belief conflicts with a job requirement, the employer must make reasonable efforts to accommodate the employee.  An employer’s failure to enter into an interactive process with the employee and/or failure to reasonably accommodate an employee may violate federal or state …